These Philly Entrepreneurs Know the Value of Filling a Room With Creatives and Culture

Here’s how a co-creative space can solve problems and generate success for local artists. December 14, 2019 1 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. William Toms and David Silver, co-founders of REC, talk about how their dream has evolved from hosting their first music event and hoping to make $10 to building a 10,000-square-foot facility for local artists, musicians and creators. The duo share their thoughts on some of the challenges they faced fundraising for their venue and how tweaking their investment structure helped them secure the funding they needed to ultimately build their community of creators. Toms, Silver and The Playbook David Meltzer discuss some of the challenges associated with pitching an idea for investment, how to handle hearing “no” and making the most of your work/life integration. Related: How to Make the Impossible a Reality Read_More Related posts: How to Craft Brilliant Escape Room Storylines – ShoeMoney The Cannabis Industry 10 Years […]

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Why You Should Pour Yourself a Glass of Water and Write for 15 Minutes Today

Daydreaming is inherently flexible. You don’t need to set aside time for it or plan how to execute it properly. It effortlessly arises and plays out until you shift your focus back to your responsibilities. Last week, I talked about getting more out of your expectations, and today I’m going to talk about a daily writing practice that helps you get more out of your daydreams. It only requires 15 minutes, and it doesn’t always have to be done at the same time. On your most productive days, it can positively impact your work, but it’s especially useful on days when you feel directionless or overwhelmed. And I’ll let you know what the glass of water is for, too. Time away from your responsibilities Now, this isn’t actually time to practice your writing. You won’t be journaling or brainstorming content ideas. You might become a better writer over time, but […]

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Writing Advice: Trick or Treat?

Happy Halloween! I have two tricks — or two treats — for you, depending on how you look at it: Realize your creative potential. Schedule the right amount of time to do excellent work. It’s that simple, and it’s that hard — and it’s about finding a specific type of balance that’s critical when building a portfolio. Professional writers learn the essential techniques that have helped grow their mentors’ careers, but they also find their own way forward by developing the habits and methods that work best for them. Progress Guide: Try This When you read Tuesday’s post, you’ll find that legendary copywriter Eugene Schwartz said, “Learning the craft and doing the research are the hard work.” Writing can be the impossible work. If you’re looking to write more consistently: Stop asking questions and start writing. (More about this in Monday’s post.) Commit to writing five days a week, even […]

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Take 15 Minutes to Find Your Winning Difference

A unique selling proposition (USP) is the reason people do business with you and not someone else — a winning difference that sets you apart and makes you the only real choice. Traditional marketing advice will have you lock yourself in a cave for weeks listing all of the features of your business, translating them into benefits, then somehow finding that one compelling point that will differentiate you from everyone else you could possibly compete with. These days, your winning difference depends more on who you’re selling to more than the features of what you’re selling. You need to stake out a favorable position in the minds of those you’re trying to attract, even while turning the wrong people away. If you have a firm grasp on what your ideal customer looks like, then you can do some simple exercises to discover your own winning difference. Three five-minute exercises to […]

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How to Kill Writer’s Block and Become a Master Copywriter in Only 3 Hours a Day

Legendary copywriter Eugene Schwartz created a system of working that, before he was finished, enabled him to write nine books (including the classic Breakthrough Advertising), dozens and dozens of successful ads, and countless articles for well-known publications all over the world. He did it all by — in his own words — writing only 3 hours a day, 5 days a week. And he did it in style. As one of the highest-paid copywriters of the 1950s and ’60s, Schwartz lived very comfortably in Manhattan. He became a world-class art collector and a respected Biblical scholar. His technique for getting copy written is offensively simple. Here’s the thing: I know what you’re going to say about this. “That’s so obvious.” Or … “Yeah, thanks for wasting my time. I’m a serious copywriter and this is insulting.” That’s fine. Ignore this approach at your own professional peril. Or, use it and […]

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This Common Belief Could Be Blocking Your Creative Potential

A woman once brought her two Pomeranians to a barbecue I attended. I had never met her before, but after overhearing her give the dogs commands in Norwegian, Italian, and English, we started talking (in English). Another guest quickly joined the conversation as well. Hamburger in hand, the other barbecue-goer explained why he’s always had trouble learning a language other than English. “I want there to be a word-for-word translation and get stuck because it doesn’t work like that,” he said. I resonated with that experience and thought about where that outlook might pop up in other aspects of life and business: There’s a reasonable question virtually everyone asks when they want to start a new creative project. We all know I like questions, but if you dedicate too much time to this one, it can be more harmful than helpful. “What’s the best way?” You’ve likely asked yourself that […]

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Why Everyone Hopes You’ll Be the Hero

I walked into the small, yellow audition room and stopped twelve feet in front of the cheap, plastic, fold-out table. There were three of them sitting in there, bored, distracted, glancing at their watches. The big heart inside my chest was pounding on the rib cage, hoping this was the one. “Hi, uh … Mr. Bruise is it?” No. 1 said. “Yes, it’s actually Bruce, but thank you, I …” “All right, what do you have for us today?” No. 3 said. He was looking down, rustling some outstandingly important paperwork into some sort of crucial order. “Yes, thank you. I, I’ll be doing a short monologue from Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night and another from Sean Penn’s turn in Carlito’s Way.” I heard one of them groan under his breath. With sweat pouring down my chest and into the front of my new shirt from Ross, I began acting like nobody’s […]

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What to Do When You Absolutely, Positively Must Know if Your Content Will Rock

Ever had a great idea, and then started to doubt yourself? Or maybe you’ve already executed on that great idea, but you’re hesitating to launch. Maybe it’s an article, or an ebook, or a new product or service. How can you be sure it will work? Should you ask for feedback? I’ll answer both of those questions in this article, but first I need to tell you a couple of stories from the nutty worlds of music and film. Let’s start with a band called Wilco. Wilco gets the shaft In 2000 and early 2001, Wilco recorded a selection of songs for a fourth studio album. Signed to Reprise Records (a subsidiary of Warner Music), the band was continuing to shift away from its “alt country” roots toward a more experimental alternative rock sound. This made the folks at Reprise nervous. After a shakeup at the top executive level of […]

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What You Need, When You Need It: Vital Digital Marketing and Sales Training

Copyblogger has always been a place that encourages creativity. We want to help people have creative careers and do meaningful work every day. It’s perfectly reasonable to want to have a job where you get to be creative. But in order to make creativity a part of your job — and not just make art for the sake of making art — you need to learn to be strategic. And that’s what we merge in our courses: the freedom to be creative, with the digital marketing and sales training that helps you build an audience that builds your business. So, if you haven’t already seen the limited-time deal we have going on right now with our Best of the Best of Copyblogger Sale, check it out by clicking this button: Start Your Copyblogger Premium Education Today I’ve outlined some of the good stuff below, as well. This week on the […]

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Get It All Now: Best of the Best Sale Is Open

If you’ve been reading the blog and listening to Copyblogger FM the past couple of weeks, you’ll know that we’re going in a different direction with our education platform. And yet, we still have a ton of current training products that are vital to your digital marketing and sales skill set. So what to do? We’ve decided to retire our current educational lineup next week … but not before making it all available to you one last time at a great, low price. Which you can take advantage of right now, because our Best of the Best of Copyblogger Sale is now open. To join our private education community for digital entrepreneurs, professional writers, and content marketers, just click the button below: Get the Best of the Best of Copyblogger “Copyblogger is the bible of content marketing.” – VentureBeat This is your chance to establish a strong educational foundation that […]

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Do You Recognize These 10 Mental Blocks to Creative Thinking?

Whether you’re trying to solve a tough problem, start a business, get attention for that business, or write an interesting article, creative thinking is crucial. The process boils down to changing your perspective and seeing things differently than you currently do. People like to call this “thinking outside of the box,” but that’s the wrong way to look at it. Just like Neo needed to understand that “there is no spoon” in the film The Matrix, you need to realize “there is no box” to step outside of. You create your own imaginary boxes simply by living life and accepting certain things as “real” when they are just as illusory as the beliefs of a paranoid delusional. The difference is, enough people agree that certain man-made concepts are “real,” so you’re viewed as “normal.” This is good for society overall, but it’s that sort of unquestioning consensus that inhibits your […]

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This Graphic-Designer-Turned-Chief-Creative-Officer Gives Advice on Unorthodox Career Paths

Here’s how to get your dream job, even if the way forward isn’t obvious. September 10, 2019 1 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. In this episode of The Rough Cut, Storyhunter co-founder Alex Ragir sits down with David Weinstock, Chief Creative Officer of RF|Binder.  Weinstock began his career as a graphic designer and gained experience as a creative director for The Oprah Winfrey Network and a commercial director for Hero Content before settling into his role at RF|Binder. While at RF|Binder, Weinstock founded The Grove, the company’s multidisciplinary creative group and winner of 2017 PR News Agency Team of the Year. Ragir and Weinstock discussed Weinstock’s evolution from graphic designer to CCO and what he learned that can help young professionals navigate their career paths. Related: This Marketing Guru Says You Should Focus on a ‘Coalition of the Willing’ Read_More Related posts: What the Chief Talent Officer of General Motors Learned […]

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Join the Copyblogger Renaissance to Pursue the Career You’re Meant to Have

If you told me 10 years ago that one day I’d be taking over writing Copyblogger’s weekly newsletter from Sonia Simone, I’d have said: “In what fantasy world? I don’t know her, and she didn’t review the guest post I submitted.” (True story.) But I believe four simple words: Hard work is luck. Long story short, Sonia and I did eventually connect and have had a great working relationship for the past five years. I’m honored she passed the baton keyboard to me and I now get to talk with you every week, in addition to the other posts I write on the blog. This week, we took Monday off to observe Labor Day in the United States. On Tuesday, Brian Clark talked about why he’s returned to Copyblogger. He shared behind-the-scenes stories about the company and what we have in store going forward. For even more details, check out […]

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The Content Crossroads: Supernatural Success at the Intersection of Ideas

Do you know what happens down at the crossroads? Legend has it that Robert Johnson — the most famous of the Delta blues musicians from the 1930s — took his second-hand guitar and went down to the crossroads in the middle of the night. When the young plantation worker returned home, his guitar skills had taken a quantum leap. The overnight improvement in Johnson’s playing wasn’t just significant; it was supernatural. Something strange happened down at that crossroads. Word got around that Johnson ventured to the crossroads to meet the Devil himself, and sold his soul to become the best blues guitarist who ever lived. Sure enough, less than a year later, Robert Johnson was the king of the Delta bluesmen, and created, played, and sang the greatest blues anyone had ever heard. Johnson is now known as the “Grandfather of Rock and Roll,” and has influenced artists ranging from […]

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The Art of Finding Ideas

Every writer who has ever lived has lusted after ideas. Where are they, how do I get them, and how do I keep them coming? If you’ve been writing long enough, you know that — like Solomon — there is nothing new under the sun. Try as you might to sweat them out of your head or pull them gently from the stars above, there are no new ideas. So, relax. But the page is not going to write itself, is it? Where then do we turn for ideas that work, ideas that move, ideas that persuade? In short, we “steal” them. The moment you free yourself from The Cult of Originality, you realize that original ideas do not come from within. They are given to us, from without. A writer should not look inside, but outside, at external sources, stories, events, and emotions. If you’re offended that I’d suggest […]

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13 Timeless Lessons from the Father of Advertising

In 1962, Time magazine called David Ogilvy: “The most sought-after wizard in today’s advertising industry.” During his years as an advertising executive and copywriter, Ogilvy created some of the world’s most successful and iconic marketing campaigns, including the legendary Man in the Hathaway Shirt, plus notable efforts for Schweppes, Rolls-Royce, and the island of Puerto Rico, among many others. Ogilvy was one of the pioneers of information-rich, “soft sell” ads that didn’t insult the intelligence of the prospect. Ogilvy’s successful advertising campaigns demonstrate how to persuade prospects, influence readers, and create memorable, evergreen content. But “The Father of Advertising” also has plenty to teach us about productivity, branding, research, and ambition. Let’s look at some things David Ogilvy had to say, and what we can learn from each of them. On creativity and creative process “In the modern world of business, it is useless to be a creative, original thinker […]

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Why Your Friend with a Creative Job Isn’t the Village Idiot

It happened again. You were out to dinner with your Writer Friend, and the waiter came over to see if you needed anything. This led to a short, friendly conversation with him. As he walked away, your meal companion apologized for reaching into her purse to get her phone. She opened her Notes application and explained: “I have to jot that down. What he said was so perfect for something I’m working on. It just gave me a bunch of ideas.” You sat back and took a sip of your Syrah while thinking: “We’re supposed to be having a relaxing dinner. The last thing I’m thinking about right now is work. She’s not doing real work anyway. It’s annoying that she calls it work.” The nonsensical nature of creative work can bewilder onlookers. But is creative work that much different from other types of work? The development of a creative […]

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How to Beat the Boring Content Blues in 30 Days

Have you ever reached a plateau with your content? You come to a point where you have a predictable amount of traffic, that traffic creates a predictable level of response (comments, clickthroughs for your product, number of backlinks, whatever), but your response doesn’t seem to budge past that point. It’s fun climbing to that spot, but less fun to get stuck there for weeks or months on end. I’m going to share a painful secret with you. It isn’t your layout or your banner. It isn’t your SEO. It’s your content. Specifically, your content has become flat and routine. You’ve found a modest audience that likes you, but your ideas and your writing aren’t sharp enough to pull in, energize, and keep new readers. Over 30 years as a professional writer, I’ve developed a method to take my writing to a stronger, deeper level. I originally got this process from […]

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Smart Choices that Lead to Impressive Content and Copywriting Results

“It is our choices, Harry, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities.” – J.K. Rowling That Albus Dumbledore was a pretty wise fellow. And you’ve probably experienced that some choices you make accumulate into rich, productive experiences … and others tend to roll up into a doughy ball of disappointment. There are a million ways to write copy and content — but the choices you make and the priorities you set will determine the results you see. This week was all about how to make the smartest possible choices when you sit down to write. On Monday, Stefanie Flaxman uncovered the magic of a micro audience. She highlights the choice of action over perfectionism, and making the decision to treat a small audience as a priority, even before you see the big wins that will come when that audience grows. On Tuesday, Loryn Cole explored the […]

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The Professional Dangers of Subterranean Creative Regret

When I was a teenager, I was a prolific poet. Not a good one — not even close — but I didn’t care. I didn’t plan on showing my work to anyone. I wrote simply because I loved it. I spent hours in my room, at a park, or even those quiet moments at school, pulling words out of my head. I edited and honed, and sometimes put those words to music. In college, I managed to keep up the habit for a while, but by the time I graduated, poetry had been crowded out by more “important” pursuits. At first, I didn’t miss it. I was so busy chasing my new career, I forgot entirely how much I used to love writing poems and songs. But a few years into my post-college life, I started to feel something was missing. Some spark, some creativity, had seeped away. I wasn’t […]

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