Hot Dog Sales Are Red-Hot. These Weiner Businesses are Giving Back.

May 22, 2020 6 min read In normal times, Memorial Day weekend might be the first time you’d consider buying hot dogs since last summer. But of course, these are not normal times, and there’s a good chance you’ve tasted snappy, meaty (possibly microwaved) frankfurter flesh more recently than that. “We’re going into our bigger months of June and July now,” says Joe Quinn, co-founder of Brooklyn hot dog company Feltman’s of Coney Island. “But since March, it’s been like July every month.” Market research from Chicago-based data-analytics firm IRI shows that in mid-March, at the height of panic-buying, hot dog sales were up 127 percent from the same time last year. And people are buying in bulk, too: eight-packs, 10-packs, 24-packs have all been flying off the shelves. That’s probably because hot dogs are an obvious quarantine choice: long shelf life, protein-dense, easy to prepare and kid-friendly. National brands […]

Read more

News Organizations Sue SBA for Refusing to Reveal Which Companies Received PPP

It has reportedly been ignoring Freedom of Information Act requests from the ‘New York Times’ and others. May 14, 2020 2 min read On Tuesday, five major news organizations sued the Small Business Administration for refusing to release details on how the SBA has dispersed the $659 billion that Congress allotted to the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). Under the Freedom of Information Act, the New York Times, Washington Post, Bloomberg, ProPublica and Dow Jones (the publisher of The Wall Street Journal) have asked for insights on which companies received PPP and how much they received, but the SBA has continued to ignore their requests. Now, those publications are filing a joint lawsuit. The SBA hasn’t argued that they should be allowed to keep the details under wraps, but that they plan on attending to FOIA requests at an indefinite later date. “At this time, the agency is focusing its efforts on assisting small […]

Read more

Minority-Owned Small Businesses Aren’t Getting Stimulus Loans. Could That Finally Change?

For four months in 2018, Danielle Edwards drove past the brownstone on the corner of 6th Avenue and St. Marks in Brooklyn. There was a “For Rent” sign in the window of the second-floor storefront, which caught her eye because the whole facade is enclosed by vintage curved glass.  “I call it the fishbowl,” she says. “I fell in love with it when I first saw it. But I thought, I’m not going to be able to afford that.” Edwards was looking for a new location for her boutique gym, The New Body Project, which claims the distinction of being the only all-women’s boot camp in Brooklyn.  Edwards, 35, started The New Body Project in 2017, after the local women’s gym she worked for shuttered suddenly. For the members — many of them women of color — the gym had been a kind of neighborhood home, and its closure was […]

Read more

Running Out of Things to Say On Zoom? This Communication Expert Wants to Help.

April 24, 2020 10 min read The  global health crisis has transformed innumerable social norms. But where everyday pleasantries are concerned, none has taken on more weight than the question: “How are you?”  Pre-crisis, the question filled dead air in transient, superficial moments. Unless it was your mother or your best friend asking, the polite thing to do was to answer in the noncommittal spirit of the question and keep things moving. Hitting the right note required a cheerful but not overly affirming response like, “Alright!” “Pretty good!” “Can’t complain!”  If you went too far in one direction — a deflated “Okay,” or a vigorous “Great!”— then the asking party would be forced to stop and say, “Just okay?” or “Why so great?” For us emotionally transparent types, slapping on the fake cheer was painful, but not as painful as explaining our existential Tuesday blues to Steve in accounting. So […]

Read more

Yes, Seventh Generation Kills COVID-19. And the Eco-Friendly Company Is Cleaning Up.

After initial consumer uncertainty, “green” cleaners are getting an unexpected boost. April 9, 2020 3 min read Back in the early days of the pandemic, as shoppers scavenged cleaning-product aisles, many eyed the “green” offerings with a measure of skepticism. So little was known about the virus — and what kills it — that even the crunchiest consumers would be forgiven for thinking, See you in sunnier times, as they reached for the Lysol wipes.   But as it turns out, eco-friendly leaders like Seventh Generation are hardly riding the pine. “I wish this were for different reasons,” says Seventh Generation CEO Joey Bergstein, speaking by phone from his home near the company’s Burlington, Vermont HQ. “But we’re seeing unprecedented demand for the products right now across our whole portfolio. And specifically, we’re seeing a much higher demand for our cleaning and hygiene products, disinfecting spray and disinfecting wipes.” Demand has skyrocketed […]

Read more

Marie Kondo Visited My Quarantine Workspace to Give Me a Lesson on Letting Go

With a little help from Zoom, the famed declutterer sized up my “home office,” and offered advice to get us all through tough times. April 7, 2020 9 min read There’s no better motivator to start Marie Kondo-ing your home than learning that Marie Kondo will be visiting your home. Though of course, in the age of the coronavirus, “visiting” means connecting over Zoom for 30 minutes. The ostensible object of our “visit” is for me to ask Kondo questions about her new book, Joy at Work, and to get feedback on tidying my workspace — a 500-square-foot apartment that I share with my boyfriend, Chad. But in truth, I’m already pretty proficient at tidying. Before I took a job at this magazine, I freelanced from home for two years, which gave me near infinite opportunities to obsess over every surface and crevice. These days, while I have my procrastination […]

Read more

This Company Is Making Texting With Your Doctor the New Normal

Vermont-based startup OhMD is making HIPAA-compliant texting free for medical practices across America and accelerating the ubiquity of telemedicine. March 26, 2020 6 min read Sometimes, the stats just speak for themselves. “We know that 98 percent of patients will read a text message, and 90 percent of those patients will see that text message within three minutes,” says Ethan Bechtel, founder of telehealth startup OhMD. “When you compare that to email, which is read 20 percent of the time, or a patient portal message, which is read 7 percent of the time, you quickly realize there is literally no other way to do this at scale.”  When Bechtel says “this,” he’s referring to the desperate battle that healthcare workers across the globe are waging against the unprecedented COVID-19 crisis. One of the most essential ways that doctors can slow the pandemic is by communicating with patients from afar, so […]

Read more

5 Words to Try On for Women’s History Month

Little Words Project makes jewelry that helps women express themselves and encourage each other. Founder Adriana Carrig recommends five words to wear now. March 4, 2020 3 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. If you ever made a BFF bracelet at summer camp, you know the particular power of looking down at your wrist and remembering that you’re someone else’s other half. Of course, once we’re grown up, often the person we need to make friends with most turns out to be ourselves. So in 2013, when Adriana Carrig founded the Little Words Project, she wanted to give women that BFF bracelet boost — using whatever language helps them love themselves or feel a larger sense of belonging. Last year Little Words sold more than 155,000 custom, handmade word bracelets, and counts celebrities like Taylor Swift, Alicia Keys, Olivia Culpo and Joey King as fans. “Strength has always […]

Read more

Here’s How Bosses Can Encourage Female Friendship

Studies show that having a best friend at work improves performance and engagement – especially for women. Here’s four ways to foster friendships in the workplace. February 26, 2020 7 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. “Do you have a best friend at work?”  It’s an innocuous enough question, right? Not so much, according to Gallup. Apparently, in 30 years of workplace engagement research, that’s the most “controversial” question the analytics company has ever asked. It riles up a whole slew of bosses who don’t believe friendships should have anything to do with a company’s bottom line. Unfortunately, women’s workplace relationships are often perceived as particularly unprofessional. To some men, the intimacy women exhibit with their friends can seem insular, chit-chatty and even threatening. Many— if not most — women have had the experience of talking with a female coworker when a male colleague walks by […]

Read more

Yes, February Is the Worst Month. Here Are 8 Ways to Finish it Strong.

Instead of just slogging through, think like the Ancient Romans, and use this week to “purify” your routine. February 24, 2020 8 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Poor February. Such an awkward, unpopular month. By the time it arrives, life’s grubby fingers have smudged up the New Year’s fresh sheen. It’s frigid outside, and daylight dwindles as fast as the box of chocolates you bought on sale after Valentine’s Day. In a 2005 Gallup survey, 1,000 Americans ranked February as the worst month of the year. Its name is even spelled funny, with that random “r” plunked in there.  But come to find out, the linguistic origins of “February” may offer some guidance on how to make the most of the winter doldrums. Our modern month is descended from “Februarius,” the month in the Roman Calendar named for the practice of februum, which means “purification.” […]

Read more

In Future AR Tech, Expect More Blasts from the Past

New research suggests that for augmented reality marketing, ‘nostalgia’ is the key to inspiring consumer action. February 4, 2020 7 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. When it comes time to rehash the most memorable Super Bowl ads, you can count on a tearjerker to take the cake. Last Sunday, Google pulled the requisite heartstrings with a spare, no-frills spot. It featured an elderly man asking Google Assistant to help him remember characteristics of his late wife Loretta: How she “loved scallops,” used to “hum showtunes” and “snort when she laughed.” Photos of the couple, taken over the decades of their lives together, flashed across the screen. It goes without saying that nostalgia — both personal and cultural — is one of our time’s most potent forces. Advertising and presidential campaigns alike have commanded it to staggering effect. But there are few places where tapping into the […]

Read more

Workplace Wellness Isn’t Just for Big Corporations. Here’s How Small Businesses Can Build a Culture of Health.

Naps, salads, open dialogue and leading by example are great places to start, says a leading workplace wellness researcher January 30, 2020 11 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Over the past decade, wellness has ballooned into a $4.2 trillion business. In the crowded marketplace of self-improvement, hardcore health innovations jostle with softcore supplements in the jade egg domain. Meanwhile, “hustle” culture has spawned a kind of work worship that has many people burning out and questioning how much they should really expect to get from (or give to) their jobs. In the midst of all this, workplace wellness is on the rise; more than 80 percent of large companies and 50 percent of small companies have implemented such programs. Despite their pervasiveness, big questions linger over what, exactly, works.   That’s something that Dr. Ron Goetzel has devoted his career to studying. Goetzel is a senior […]

Read more